Saturday, February 27, 2016

Library of Congress acquires courtroom drawing collection: The Thomas Girardi Collection

Library of Congress acquires courtroom drawing collection from The Illustrated Courtroom: 50 Years of Court Art. 

The Thomas Girardi Collection.

Links to news stories below:

http://www.courthousenews.com/2016/02/29/library-of-congress-adds-96-courtroom-drawings.htm

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/02/26/library-congress-acquires-courtroom-drawing-collection.html

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/gallery/2016/feb/26/courtroom-drawings-famous-trials-bernie-madoff-charles-manson

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/03/05/courtroom-illustrators-capture-side-us-justice-system-rarely-seen/81339236/

NY Times: Library of Congress Acquires Drawings of Courtroom Drama 

by Alexandra Stevenson


Bernard L. Madoff is handcuffed as he turns away from the victims of hisPonzi scheme, who applaud his arrest. Charles Manson lunges toward a judge with a pencil in his hand, agitated at being denied the chance to cross-examine a detective. Larry Flynt of Hustler magazine sits in a gold-plated wheelchair looking on from a distance as the Supreme Court debates the boundaries of the First Amendment.
These illustrations are part of 96 courtroom drawings that the Library of Congress has acquired as part of the Thomas V. Girardi collection, named after the prominent Los Angeles lawyer best known for leading a personal injury lawsuit made famous by the film about the consumer activist Erin Brockovich.

Bernard Madoff going to prison by Elizabeth Williams

The three illustrators featured in the collection — Aggie Kenny, Bill Robles and Elizabeth Williams — have chronicled famous trials over the last half-century, including the Wall Street trials of the “junk-bond king” Michael R. Milken, the entrepreneur Martha Stewart and Ivan F. Boesky, convicted of masterminding what was then the biggest insider-trading scandal in the 1980s. The newly acquired collection also includes politically sensitive trials, including those of the Iran-contra defendants; the French politician Dominique Strauss-Kahn; the World Trade Center bomber, Mohammed A. Salameh; and Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, son-in-law of Osama Bin Ladin.


Larry Flynt at the United States Supreme Court during the landmark 1st amendment argument in the Falwell v Flynt case. Artwork by Aggie Whelan Kenny



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